Indoor Living | Pt 2

Happy New Year folks!

Last year was a pretty decent one for me, with loads of changes, new experiences and chapters starting up! However, one chapter remaining open was my Indoor Living post, so here’s part 2 as promised. Hopefully you all have some pennies left over from Christmas, or have a few vouchers to cash in, so this post might inspire you to spend them on a few greeneries for your home.

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The Chlorophytum Comosum, or Spider plant, is a new addition to my home, picked up from a car boot for 50p. It’s a great plant for any home as it’s super easy and adaptable. This would be a plant that doesn’t mind being pot-bound. Just keep an eye on the roots coming through the bottom of the pot, then you can upgrade it. I’d suggest a place where it can enjoy sunlight, but not directly, and it just needs enough water so it’s not soggy and wet.

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The spider plant is a trailing variety and needs some room to throw down it’s foliage; so I recommend a bookshelf or small surface high table somewhere to allow it to do its thing. You can see from the photo it’s still quite a little’un and should start to grow more rapidly!

Now, some people consider Ivy as a pest. My boyfriend couldn’t understand why I wanted Ivy plants in the house when he spent a whole summer clearing it from the side of his parent’s house! But I adore the variegated leaves and trailing habit of the Ivy. They come in small pots, so I have just bought two larger sized, plain pots to settle them in, and I’ll see how they get on. I think they’re a great addition to my shelves, giving them enough space to trail off the edges. Frequently, such as once a week, for watering and some Baby Bio once a month does the trick.

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Dracaena Marginata, or commonly know as Dragon Tree (great name) is another favourite. I’ve got two slightly different dragon trees; one which is the Warneckii Dragon Plant and the other a Standard Dragon Tree. One lives in my bathroom and the other in my living room so they have indirect sunlight and a fairly constant temperature.  Caring for them is pretty simple too, as with most house plants mentioned so far. They like to be watered once a week, and fed once a month.

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I tend to mist a lot of my plants too, as per recommendations of particular varieties, such as the Dragon Tree. I picked up this cute spray bottle (below) from Wilkinsons for dead cheap, and it’s perfect for picking up and misting my different plants as I mooch around the house, such as this one and my Fern.

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The one below is a strange one. I’m actually not sure what this one is! I found this huge tuber with a few sprouting leaves in my garden and thought  I’d have a go at rescuing it. It really was a sorry sight, but I’m so glad I gave it a go because it’s now grown on so much. About 10 new shoots have developed and it’s thriving in my living room. I planted it in normal multi-use compost and added some pebbles from drainage on the bottom, and for aesthetic purposes on the top. It will probably need potting on to a larger container, but I didn’t expect it to do so well so just left it in this one for the time being.

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I’m no expert on house plants by any means,  but hopefully these two posts help inspire some indoor living; what to pick, where to buy and place, basic care and any other little tips. If in doubt, just pick up the label and read it well, and if it doesn’t have one I’d recommend to do a little online research.

What plants do you have in your house? Drop me a comment below.

xo

 

 

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